October 21, 2014
"No writing is wasted. Did you know that sourdough from San Francisco is leavened partly by a bacteria called lactobacillus sanfrancisensis? It is native to the soil there, and does not do well elsewhere. But any kitchen can become an ecosystem. If you bake a lot, your kitchen will become a happy home to wild yeasts, and all your bread will taste better. Even a failed loaf is not wasted. Likewise, cheese makers wash the dairy floor with whey. Tomato gardeners compost with rotten tomatoes. No writing is wasted: the words you can’t put in your book can wash the floor, live in the soil, lurk around in the air. They will make the next words better."

— Erin Bow (via observando)

October 14, 2014
"Love doesn’t just sit there, like a stone, it has to be made, like bread; remade all the time, made new."

Ursula K. Le Guin (via kushandwizdom)

(via neil-gaiman)

October 13, 2014
"Writers aren’t people exactly. Or, if they’re any good, they’re a whole lot of people trying so hard to be one person."

— F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Love of the Last Tycoon (via wordsnquotes)

(Source: wordsnquotes.com, via literatureismyutopia)

October 8, 2014
foodffs:

Seafood Spaghetti Baked in Paper (Spaghetti al Cartoccio)

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

foodffs:

Seafood Spaghetti Baked in Paper (Spaghetti al Cartoccio)

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

October 8, 2014
inneroptics:

Karin Rosenthal

inneroptics:

Karin Rosenthal

(via absyntheofmalice)

October 8, 2014

foodffs:

roasted red pepper soup with corn and feta

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

October 8, 2014
amandaonwriting:

Quotable - Tim O’Brien, born 1 October 1946

amandaonwriting:

Quotable - Tim O’Brien, born 1 October 1946

October 8, 2014
amandaonwriting:

Writing Quote – Linda Lay Shuler

amandaonwriting:

Writing Quote – Linda Lay Shuler

October 8, 2014

asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson

Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?

“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.

 

(via cinefamily)

October 8, 2014
tamburina:

Vincent van Gogh, View of Saintes-Maries, 1888

tamburina:

Vincent van GoghView of Saintes-Maries, 1888

October 8, 2014

neptunain:

to catch a bus you have to think like a bus

(via mambonumber69)

October 6, 2014
"My daughter is seven, and some of the other second-grade parents complain that their children don’t read for pleasure. When I visit their homes, the children’s rooms are crammed with expensive books, but the parent’s rooms are empty. Those children do not see their parents reading, as I did every day of my childhood. By contrast, when I walk into an apartment with books on the shelves, books on the bedside tables, books on the floor, and books on the toilet tank, then I know what I would see if I opened the door that says ‘PRIVATE—GROWNUPS KEEP OUT’: a child sprawled on the bed, reading."

— Anne Fadiman (via observando)

October 6, 2014
"Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can. But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two of no importance, and gloom is but the passing shadow of a cloud…"

— Yann Martel, Life of Pi (via observando)

October 6, 2014
amandaonwriting:

Quotable - David Brin, born 6 October 1950

amandaonwriting:

Quotable - David Brin, born 6 October 1950

October 6, 2014
"One of the few good things about modern times: If you die horribly on television, you will not have died in vain. You will have entertained us."

— Kurt Vonnegut (via observando)